25th November 2018

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Happy Birthday Leonard Woolf – 25th November 1880

“It is the journey, not the arrival which matters.”

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“It is never right for any government to do any vast evil as a means to some hypothetical good.”

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Monday 11th November 1918

At 11 in the morning the maroons were fired.  From this we knew that the Armistice had been signed and that the Great War had ended.  Virginia celebrated the peace by going to her dentist in Harley Street.  We met in Wigmore Street and drifted to Trafalgar Square.  The first hours of peace were terribly depressing.  The Square, indeed all the streets, were solid with people, omnibuses, and vehicles of all kinds.  A thin, fine, cold rain fell remorselessly on us all.  Some of us carried sodden flags, some of us staggered in and out of pubs, we wandered aimlessly in the rain and mud with no means of celebrating peace or expressing our relief and joy.

Leonard Woolf: Beginning Again 1911-1918

Armistice Remembrance Day

11th November 1918 – 11th November 2018

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………. pray you’ll never know

The hell where youth and laughter go.

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 Suicide in the Trenches – Siegfried Sassoon / February 1918

Siegfried Sassoon Diaries 1923–1925

I went to [Hogarth House] Paradise Road, Richmond, this evening, intending to be discreet and observantly detached. But the evening was a gossipy affair, very pleasant and unconstrained. V[irginia]. W[oolf]. drew me out adroitly, and I became garrulous. (Did I bore them once or twice?)

Leonard Woolf seemed reticent and rather weary; anyhow my presence reduced him to comparative muteness. V. W. is a very fastidious lady, and looked lovely (in a lavender silk dress). She has very slender hands and a face for a miniature painter.

Thank heaven, I avoided giving my ‘war-experiences’ turn. (Though I did touch on Craiglockhart Hospital, in connection with Wilfred Owen.)  They agreed with me about the modem vulgarisation of fine literature by the commercialism of publishers; and urged me to publish a book with the Hogarth Press. I dallied with the idea of a small volume of ‘scraps of prose’, vaguely visualising selections from my journal, which I feel now to be quite impracticable. We dined in their kitchen, which was pleasant and cosy.

Ottoline [Morrell] told me that ‘Virginia is very inhuman’, but I found her charming.

 

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Happy Birthday Virginia Woolf – 25th January 2018

Virginia asked (After a quarrel)
“Do you ever think me beautiful now?”
Leonard replied :
“The most beautiful of women.”

“In 1927 To the Lighthouse was published and was distinctly more successful than any of her previous books.  That meant that at the age of 47, having written for at least 27 years and having produced five novels, Virginia succeeded in earning as much as £545 (£28,000) in a year.”

Leonard Woolf

 

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                                     25th January 2017          Happy Birthday Virginia Woolf

Virginia

When I remember how, owing to her health, Virginia always had to restrict her daily writing to a few hours and often had to give up writing for weeks or even months, how slowly she wrote and how persistently she revised and worked over what she had written before she published it, I am amazed that she had written and published seventeen books before she died.  This is more surprising because none of these books had been written before the age of 30.

Leonard Woolf.

 

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Happy Birthday, Leonard Woolf:  25th November 2016

If you know what you want,
it is not very hard to find
the means of getting it….
the muddle and failure of the world
is from people having a vague and random
conception of what they want.

Leonard Woolf : Sowing 1880-